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ECE

Dynamic Projects and Minimalistic Workspace Setup in Enterprise Environment

in ECE, ECE2011, Video, Eclipse
Eclipse

Abstract: We will describe our journey into setting up minimalistic development environment at eBay. Developers tend to include many source projects in their workspaces because they may potentially need to view, debug or otherwise tinker with included source. While viewing and debugging are possible with precompiled project libraries (jars), they don’t allow one to make modifications.

We describe dynamic projects as a way to bridge this gap by allowing developers to include projects in their binary form with an option to convert them to source projects! Like PDE but with regular JDT projects. This can be taken a step further by including only the source files being modified while having the rest of them come from their binary form. This is done by manipulating classpath which can elegantly be handled using custom classpath container.

With the dynamic projects, as much of the code is brought as binary, we run the risk of not caching the compilation issues due to source changes that affect their dependent binaries. We describe technique used to detect such binary compatibility breakage that would have gotten caught if those elements where coming as source.

Developers tend to import or create all the source projects they need before hand and compile and build everything even if they don’t edit it. There is a reason why they do that. They want to see the source, put break points, run individually, basically they want to play around with it a little bit.. This is exactly what dynamic projects enable them with i.e. cater all the facilities of a source project without the overhead of compilation. As we all know nothing comes for free, we need to build the binary and source jars for these projects and keep them available for using it in the dynamic project. Once the developers decides to edit a file, that’s when we provision the source as real source and compile it.

Let us take it to the next level, Till now we treated the whole project or a jar as a single unit. Why even that? How about we convert only the single file you want to edit. Amazing huh??. That’s what really makes the dynamic projects big. Here we let the developer modify just the files he wants to edit, and the rest of the code comes as binary from the jar files. The whole classpath complexity associated with the above two use cases is being handled inside of a custom classpath container.

Let us try to make it a little more interesting by detecting binary compatibility in this scenario. One of the biggest problems with libraries especially utility libraries is that changes to the API might break the binary compatibility. Earlier, this type of errors were be detected by compiling the consumer source code and if the consumers are binaries. In the worst case if consumers are not recompiled against the changed API,, then these errors will be manifested as run time errors there by breaking the production. Here we are addressing this issue, by detecting the binary compatibility breakage inside of the jars on the fly. Basically as and when user edits it, we signal the user if he breaks an existing consumer with his change.

Event: 
ECE2011
Speaker: 
Mahesh Somani
Suresh Mathew

TMF meets GMF - Combining Graphical and Textual Modeling

in ECE, ECE2011, Video, Eclipse
Eclipse

Both, graphical as well as textual modeling, indisputably have their respective advantages (and disadvantages). And while a few evangelists might praise the superiority of one formalism over the other, the combination of both into a single integrated modeling tool seems to be the holy grail most modelers are indeed searching for.

While with the GMF runtime, a mature framework to develop graphical modeling tools has already been around for quite a while (which is now complemented by Graphiti), Xtext has recently closed the gap with respect to textual modeling. As such, the longed for undertaking has in theory - at least to some extent - become feasible.

Within this talk I will sketch how the integration of fully featured Xtext cell editors with support for syntax highlighting, auto-completion, scoping, and validation into a GMF-based graphical editor (and its related property sheets) can be technically achieved.

Event: 
ECE2011
Speaker: 
Alexander Nyßen

Spraying - the natural way to create Graphiti

in ECE, ECE2011, Video, Eclipse
Eclipse

The Graphiti framework is a new approach to create highly sophisticated visual editors on top of the GEF framework. Creating editors with Graphiti is fairly simple, but yet repetitive, which makes it a candidate to be supported by the means of model-driven development.

Spray (http://code.google.com/a/eclipselabs.org/p/spray/) provides Xtext based tooling to describe Visual DSL Editors against the Graphiti runtime, and code generation (with Xtend2) to create the boilerplate code for realizing the implementation. Potentially the Spray DSL can be used to generate code for other frameworks as well.

This session will show the Spray tooling to create a Graphiti editor within minutes.

Event: 
ECE2011
Speaker: 
Jos Warmer
Karsten Thoms

Requirements Modeling Framework: a Game-Changer

in ECE, ECE2011, EMF, Video, Eclipse
Eclipse

The Eclipse ecosystem provides a number of projects to support software development and systems engineering. However, in the open source community, one important aspect of the engineering process has been very much neglected until now - Requirements Management. The "Requirements Modeling Framework" (RMF) is a proposed open source project under the "Model Development Tools Project".

The goal of RMF is to provide the community with a solid implementation of the OMG ReqIF (Requirements Interchange Format) standard upon which various requirements management tools can be built as well as integrated. RMF plans to provide a means for data exchange between tools, an EMF based meta-model, infrastructure tooling and user interface.

The talk would provide first-hand information about the new project, its scope and current state. The session would also be chance to inform yourself about the importance of this standardization effort in requirements management domain.

Event: 
ECE2011
Speaker: 
Andreas Graf