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BSD

Articles related to the BSD family of licenses.

Intro to DNSSEC

in BSDCan, BSDCan2012, Networking, Security, BSD

Location

Ottawa, ON
Canada
45° 25' 17.508" N, 75° 41' 49.8948" W

Jeremy C. Reed serves on the board of directors of The NetBSD Foundation and the BSD Certification Group.

Event: 
BSDCan2012
Speaker: 
Jeremy C. Reed

pfSense 2.1: IPv6 and more

in BSDCan, BSDCan2012, Networking, BSD

Location

Ottawa, ON
Canada
45° 25' 17.508" N, 75° 41' 49.8948" W

pfSense is a BSD licensed customized distribution of FreeBSD tailored for use as a firewall and router.

Event: 
BSDCan2012
Speaker: 
Chris Buechler
Scott Ullrich

Getting Started in an Open Source Community

in Community, SC2010, BSD, Misc

Location

Ottawa, ON
Canada
45° 24' 41.6592" N, 75° 41' 53.4984" W

This presentation will be of interest to those who have never been active within an open source project or have been lurking instead of contributing. It will discuss the following:

  • why would I want to contribute?
  • how do I narrow down which community to contribute to?
  • what type of contributions can I make (e.g. what if I can't or don't want to code?)
  • how do I introduce myself and get started?
Event: 
Summercamp2010
Speaker: 
Dru Lavigne

The NetBSD Way

in BSD, Community, Security, Sysadmin, NetBSD, BSD, Misc
Speaker: 
David Maxwell
Event: 
Summercamp2010
Abstract: 

The origins of BSD and Open Source predate the modern Linux renaissance by a decade and a half, and BSD derived codebases are still going strong. What makes a BSD community different from a Linux community? What technological decisions are given more priority in the BSD world? Why should you care, and why should you use BSD? Come and hear a new perspective. The first BSD Unix-derivative operating system was developed in 1977. Shared as Open Source from the beginning, it provided many people's first exposure to the Open Source concept - especially through its use as the basis for the original SunOS, or the reuse of its TCP/IP stack on widely varied systems (including MS Wi ndows). More recently, whole generations of Open Source developers have grown familiar with Linux as an operating system and community structure, and they've had limited, or no, exposure to BSD. The two cultures have similarities, but also many differences in their approach to community building, code maintenance, design and development, and project man agement. Many OSCON conference attendees may only have exposure to The Linux Way. Come and hear about The BSD Way, and you'll find out why BSD is still going strong, the benefits it can offer you as a user or as a developer, and why us BSD folks don't just drop it all and contribute to Linux instead.

Level: 
Beginner
Time: 
2010-05-31T16:36